Policing tagged posts

MEASURE | Big Data & Community Policing Conference 2018

MEASURE | Big Data & Community Policing Conference 2018
Event on 2018-08-23 17:00:00
Join MEASURE, Friendship West Baptist Church and Next Generation Action Network for the 2nd Big Data & Community Policing Conference, a three-day event where attendees will participate in panel discussions by experts in the fields of law enforcement, social advocacy, research and technology. In partnership with Mark43, this symposium will explore current and emerging efforts to improving the relationship between citizens and police through uses of data that increase transparency, build community trust, and strengthen accountability. Donations for Big Data & Community Policing will be applied to the cost of the conference and any remaining funding will help MEASURE meet its annual mission and goals. Who Should Attend? Law enforcement leaders, activists, tech developers, students, analysts, concerned citizens, and stakeholders. Why Attend? The goal of “Big Data & Community Policing ” is to highlight the best in thought leadership as we pursue the next generation of community policing. Check out an overview of our agenda below: DAY 1 | Thursday – August 23, 2018 5pm-7pm Networking Mixer – Fairmont Hotel Downtown Dallas DAY 2 | Friday – August 24, 2018 4:30pm-8:30pm Big Data & Community Policing Symposium – Friendship West Church Keynote Speaker: Chief Renee Hall of the Dallas Police Department DAY 3 | Saturday – August 25, 2018 8am-3pm Big Data & Community Policing Training & Workshops *All programming will be finalized by June 1 Check In begins at 9:30am breaking at 12:30pm for the Networking Expo What Will You Learn? Topics will vary by panel, but attendees will learn directly from experts about the advancements in smart policing initiatives and modern technology adoption that will be critical in ensuring effective community building through transparency and the collection of better data. Panels will discuss the following: How Big Data is helping police departments better connect with the citizens they serve How Big data can be used as a best practice for accountability and reform What can we do to promote and recognize the best behavior in officers and how can that be measured How Big Data can better tell the story of police engagement scenarios How Big Data can make connections and detect patterns so police can prevent and solve crime How Big Data is allowing police to better understand diverse cultures AND MORE! Shared knowledge is what makes Big Data work! Current and Past Participating Sponsors & Partners (List is constantly being updated) Mark43 Dallas Police Department Huston-Tillotson University Austin Police Association American Society of Evidence-Based Policing Renee Mitchell Urban Institute Vera Institute Austin Justice Coalition Austin Police Department Pflugerville Police Department Houston Police Department Travis County Sheriff's Dept Travis County Constable Precinct 1 Presenting Sponsor Mark43 BDCP Supporter ASEBP BDCP Supporter Huston-Tillotson University] BDCP Supporter Dallas Police Department

at Friendship-West Baptist Church
2020 West Wheatland Road
Dallas, United States

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John Aubrey’s challengers say no policing experience necessary to be Jefferson sheriff

John Aubrey’s challengers say no policing experience necessary to be Jefferson sheriff
Jefferson County Sheriff John Aubrey’s two opponents in the upcoming election don’t have his decades of law enforcement experience, but they say that doesn’t matter.
Read more on Louisville Courier-Journal

‘iPlayer for radio’ set for December launch
Radio streaming application containing content from BBC and commercial stations unveiled at Radio Festival in Salford A BBC-backed radio streaming application with the potential of allowing users access to audio content from more than 400 stations nationwide is to launch in December. The first working version of the UK Radioplayer project – dubbed “the iPlayer for radio” – was unveiled at the …
Read more on Guardian Unlimited

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Policing the Plains

Policing the Plains

A few years ago I was away north of Edmonton on the trail of Alexander Mackenzie, fur trader and explorer, who a century and a quarter before had made the amazing journey from the prairies over the mountains to the Pacific Coast. We looked with something like awe and wonder at the site of the old fort near the famous Peace River Crossing, from which, after wintering there in 1792, he had started out on that unprecedented expedition, and we followed up the majestic Peace to Fort Dunvegan, past whose present location Mackenzie had gone his adventurous way. And during our trip we came across a little frontier encampment building itself into a primitive wooden town in view of the advent of a railway that was heading that way. It was a characteristic outfit with lax ideas in regard to laws which touched upon personal desires as to gambling, strong drink, Sunday trading and the rest. These men were out to make money as their type has been on most of the frontiers of civilization, and the unwary traveller or the lonely settler who ventured unduly was promptly fleeced of his possessions and turned out amidst a good deal of revelry in the hours of night. And then one day there rode into that shack-town a young athlete in a uniform of scarlet and gold, the rough-rider hat, the tunic of red, the wide gold stripe to the top of the riding boots and the shining spurs. He rode in alone from the nearest post some 60 miles away and, when he dismounted, threw off the heavy saddle and picketed his horse, a sudden air of orderliness settled on the locality. The young man, going around with that characteristic cavalry swing, issued a few warnings, tacked up a notice or two and then saddling his rested steed rode away at a canter over the plain. But the air of orderliness remained in that region after the horseman had disappeared over the horizon just as if he were still present. This was puzzling to a newcomer who was along, and he asked me what manner of man this young rider was that he was received with such deference and that his orders, so quietly given, were so instantly and so continuously obeyed.
The answer was made out of a life-long acquaintance with the history and the real life of Western Canada: “Well, it is not the young constable himself that counts so mightily, though he is a likely looking fellow enough who could be cool anywhere and who could give ample evidence of possessing those muscles of steel which count in a hand-to-hand encounter. But you see he is one of that widely known body of men called the Royal North-West Mounted Police. They have patrolled and guarded and guided this whole North-West Country for the last forty years and more. During that period they have built up a great tradition which rests on a solid foundation of achievement. Their reputation for courage is unchallenged, their record for giving every man of whatever race or colour a square deal is unique, their inflexible determination to see that law is enforced is well known and their refusal to count the odds against them when duty is to be done has been absolutely proven again and again. All these elements and others have created the Mounted Police tradition to such an extent that the one constable you saw is looked on as the embodiment of the Empire which plays no favourites but which at the same time will stand no nonsense from anyone. And perhaps most wonderful of all is that part of their record which shows that they have done all this and more without any violence or repression, except as a last resort. They were always more ready and anxious to save human life than to destroy it.”

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