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Burscough Wharf 25

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(C)2011 Mike Johnson Mikeseye Photographic

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Why I Love Old Radio Shows – Growing Up in Front of the Big Green Eye

I  love the great old radio shows.  I have since the time I was a kid in the 50’s.  In fact, I still remember my first encounter.

I was barely old enough to stand in my crib, but I can remember staring across the bedroom at the big, green hypnotic eye — and finding it staring right back at me.  The green eye was right above a big knob and both were located on the front of a large brown box.

The green eye glowed in the dark.

Much to my delight, whenever I could get my hands on the big knob and turn it, the big green eye would open wider and then partially shut again.

Wow!  I was fascinated with radios before I ever even heard any of the great old radio shows.

That memory goes back to the days when I was still in my parents’ bedroom.  Later, when I was old enough to have a room of my own, that radio went with me.

When Mom or Dad tucked me in at night, I always asked them to turn on the radio.  I was probably 5 or 6 years old.

I can remember laying in bed in the soft green glow of that radio, listening to The Lucky Lager Dance Party. They played songs by Patti Page and Perry Como, Theresa Brewer and Eddie Fisher, Rosemary Clooney and Frankie Laine. Oh, and they played the song “Dream” by Johnny Mercer at the end of every show.

The real magic started one night when, for whatever reason, I couldn’t sleep.

I remember it like it was yesterday. I stealthily climbed out of bed and tiptoed across the room to turn the big dial that made that magical green eye flicker.

With one turn of the knob, Artie Shaw’s orchestra was suddenly transformed into the sound of horse hooves clip-clopping at a gallop. I heard a cowboy on one of the horses yelling to another to stop! — or he’d shoot.

What was this?

Leaving the knob in the new position, I hurriedly scampered back into bed, pulling the covers up to my chin.

There in that semi-dark room, illuminated by the glow of my radio’s magical green eye, I clutched my covers to my chest and became totally mesmerized by the my first true old radio show.  I heard the voice of  Marshall Matt Dillon as he climbed down from his horse and ordered another cowboy, whose name was Raimey, not to draw his gun.

It got real silent –  except for the sound of the mean breathing.

The cowboy named Raimey said very slowly he wouldn’t be hanged.

Silence.

Suddenly Marshall Dillon was yelling:  “Don’t Do It, Raimey! Put down your gun!” but the sounds of gunfire exploded into the room.

Silence.

What happened?  Who was shot?

Next a man named Chester was running and yelling.   When he stopped, I could actually hear him looking down at the cowboy laying on the ground.

“You got him, Mr. Dillon.  He’s gone.”

Silence.

Wow! How great was this?!!

The very next year I saw my new friend, Matt Dillon, on television – obviously not the same Matt Dillon who was on my radio.  Radio Matt was the real Marshal Dillon.

As far as I’m concerned, he still is.

That was my first encounter with old radio shows — but it certainly would not be my last.  In fact, some of my fondest moments growing up were in front of my radio.

Bob Bro has a collection of over 7,000 old time radio shows. He shares his passion on his blog: http://theoldtimeradioshow.com, where he invites you to drop in anytime and listen to some of his favorite great old radio shows! You can also hear Bob on his daily one hour radio show on Yesterday USA the non profit internet radio station that has been playing commercial free old time radio shows 24 hours a day for over 25 years.

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Lastest Internet Radio News

Firelight

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Cool Live Radio images

Some cool live radio images:

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater – 3/23/11

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Seven Second Delay – 3/23/11 – UCB Theater

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater 11/28/12

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Seven Second Delay – 11/28/12 – UCB Theater

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Cool Live Radio images

A few nice live radio images I found:

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater – 10/19/11

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Seven Second Delay – 10/19/11 – UCB Theater

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Nice Radio Station photos

A few nice radio station images I found:

Image from page 91 of “Amateur radio : how and why of wireless with complete instructions on operation of receiving outfits” (1922)

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: amateurradiohoww00grai
Title: Amateur radio : how and why of wireless with complete instructions on operation of receiving outfits
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Grainger, Maurice J
Subjects: Radio Amateur radio stations
Publisher: New York : James A. McCann
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Modern Amateur Antenna Installation. WTrefaxz

Text Appearing After Image:
Overhead View of Same. AMATEUR RADIO 71 tion of radio signals, especially music orspeech. There are numerous types of aerials whichmay be used for receiving purposes. Thebest types for the amateur will be eitherthe straight-away inverted L type or thestraight-away T type. These aerials re-ceive their name from the method of connec-tion of the lead in wire. In the invertedL type the lead-in is connected from theend of the aerial while in the T type thelead-in wire is taken from the center of aerial.The inverted L type is generally employedand is the better for receiving. The aerial may consist of any number ofwires. While a one-wire^ aerial will give ex-cellent results in receiving, an aerial consistingof two or four wires has greater capacity andis to be preferred. If it is desired to receivefrom short wave-length stations, we wouldsuggest that aerial be not more than 100 feetin length. Another important feature in connectionwith the antenna is the lightning ground con-nection. All an

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Snake on the lake

Image by Lost Albatross
I went to check out the official anniversary party and unveiling of the new studio digs for Madison’s own student radio station, WSUM 91.7FM – and boy do they have a nice new space. Read more about it here.

I miss having a radio show. I may have to rectify that situation this summer….

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Nice Live Radio photos

Some cool live radio images:

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater – 3/23/11

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Chef Mike Colameco on Seven Second Delay – 3/23/11 – UCB Theater

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater – 7/13/11

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Seven Second Delay – 7/13/11 – UCB Theater

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater 8/8/12

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Baratunde Thurston on Seven Second Delay – 8/8/12 – UCB Theater 7sd-1554

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Nice Live Radio photos

A few nice live radio images I found:

Seven Second Delay – Live @ The UCB Theater – 7/27/11

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David Wain on Seven Second Delay – 7/27/11 – UCB Theater

It’s a Wonderful Life : A Live Radio Play – Camp Humphreys, South Korea – 11 December 2014

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Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys
-U.S. Army photos by Terese Toennies.

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Nice Live Radio photos

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It’s a Wonderful Life : A Live Radio Play – Camp Humphreys, South Korea – 11 December 2014

Image by USAG-Humphreys
Click here to learn more about Camp Humphreys
-U.S. Army photos by Terese Toennies.

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Cool Radio Station images

Check out these radio station images:

Fogos em Montreal / Fireworks at Montreal

Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura
Festival Internacional de Fogos de Montreal

L’International des Feux Loto-Québec, also known as the Montreal Fireworks Festival, is a major international fireworks competition. (It was formerly known as Le Mondial SAQ, and l’International Benson & Hedges.) It has been held yearly in La Ronde over the Dolphins lake, since 1985, and is named after its main sponsor, Loto-Québec. The display is hailed as the best and largest fireworks festival in the world. It hosts an estimated 3 million each year, with approximately 6,000 fireworks set off during each show.

Each summer, eight or nine pyrotechnical companies from different countries present a 30-minute long pyromusical show, competing for the Gold, Silver and Bronze Jupiters or trophies.

For the 20th anniversary in 2004, eight of the previous top competitors (all of whom had won the Gold Jupiter) were invited to fight for the unique Platinum Jupiter in June and July 2004, which was won in the end by the German company WECO.

The competition takes the form of a series of biweekly fireworks shows usually beginning in late June and ending in late July. The fireworks are synchronized to music which is also broadcast over a provincial radio station (RockDétente in 2005, Rythme FM 2006-onwards). Spectators can purchase tickets to have reserved seats in La Ronde: they can buy them on site, on-line or through the Admission group to obtain an exceptional view of the lower altitude display and the whole perspective. However, tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of people watch the fireworks for free from nearby locations.
Wikipedia

NYC – Brooklyn: Brooklyn Navy Yard – Building 11

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The Brooklyn Navy Yard, also known as the New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), is located in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the East River. The waterfront site was used to build merchant vessels following the American Revolution. Federal authorities purchased the old docks and 40 acres of land in 1801, and it became an active US Navy shipyard in 1906. By the American Civil War, the yard had expanded to employ about 6000 men. In 1890, the ill-fated Maine was launched from the Yard’s ways.

On the eve of World War II, the yard contained more than five miles of paved streets, four drydocks, two steel shipways, and six pontoons and cylindrical floats for salvage work, barracks for marines, a power plant, a large radio station, and a railroad spur, as well as the expected foundries, machine shops, and warehouses. In 1937 the battleship North Carolina was laid down. The battleship Iowa was completed in 1942 followed by the USS Missouri (BB-63) and then in 1952, Antietam. At its peak, during World War II, the yard employed 70,000 people, 24 hours a day.

The Navy decommissioned the yard in 1966 and sold it to the City of New York. A few decades later, it became an area of private manufacturing and commercial activity. It now has over 200 tenants with more than 3,500 employees, and is managed and operated by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation for the City of New York

Open House New York weekend, America’s largest architect and design event, opens doors throughout New York City each October. The 8th Annual openhousenewyork Weekend will be held October 9 & 10, 2010. openhousenewyork (OHNY) is a non-profit cultural organization founded in 2001 in New York City, to promote awareness and appreciation of New York’s architecture, design and cultural heritage through year-round, educational programs. Through direct experiences and dialogue with architects, designers, planners, and scholars, OHNY opens doors for the public to discover cutting-edge new work, restoration of city landmarks, construction of infrastructure and engineering works and neighborhood planning efforts.

EDEN_NoNumbers_0003

Image by Photographers for Charity
From the website for "No Numbers" – "Three women tell their stories of recovery from disordered eating and in so doing rediscover values that move beyond inches, weight and other measures."

in support of EDEN’s 2009 "Love Your Body" campaign, & MC’d by the talented Jay-Jay Feeney (morning show host, "The Edge" radio station)

Full story on our site here

Our Photographer for Charity was
James Hancox

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