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Works showcasing the BSO’s strings, winds, brass, and percussion – BARTÓK Concerto for Orchestra

Works showcasing the BSO’s strings, winds, brass, and percussion – BARTÓK Concerto for Orchestra
Event on 2018-10-12 13:30:00
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With a "scrupulous ear for instrumental color and blend" (Washington Post) and bringing "a distinctive dynamism to the podium" (Baltimore Sun), the 2017/18 season marks Hannu Lintu's fifth year as Chief Conductor of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Last season's highlights include a concert tour to Russia, with performances at the Moscow Conservatory, Vyborg's House of Culture and St Petersburg's Philharmonic Grand Hall, and a performance of Väin??Raitio's opera Princess Cecilia (the first in 80 years) at the Helsinki Festival – both part of celebrations marking 100 years of Finnish independence. On Independence Day (6 December 2017) the orchestra honours its 90th anniversary and 100-year-old Finland, premiering newly commissioned works by longtime FRSO collaborator Magnus Lindberg and Lotta Wennäkoski. Seven more premieres are scheduled throughout the season, along with performances of Bartók's Bluebeard's Castle and Beethoven's Fidelio among others. In March 2018 the FRSO tours Spain and Germany with cellist Sol Gabetta, taking in such venues as the Berlin Philharmonie and the Cologne Philharmonie.

Highlights of Lintu's 2017/18 season include returns to the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, and the Dallas Symphony and Detroit Symphony orchestras. Lintu also makes his debut with the Naples Philharmonic, Singapore Symphony and Hiroshima Symphony orchestras. Recent engagements include the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Luzerner Sinfonieorchester, Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, and the St Louis Symphony, Baltimore and Toronto Symphony orchestras, as well as three acclaimed European debuts: Staatsorchester Stuttgart Opera, Radio-Symphonieorchester Wien and NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester.

A regular in the pit, Lintu returns to the Savonlinna Opera Festival in July 2018 to conduct Verdi's Otello – in 2017 he conducted Aulis Sallinen's Kullervo as part of Finland's centenary celebrations. The Finnish National Opera and Ballet also honoured 100 years of independence in a special collaborative project with director/choreographer Tero Saarinen of Sibelius's Kullervo, with Lintu receiving rave reviews: "No other conductor – including several distinguished Sibelians – I have heard in this music has been quite so willing to show what makes [Kullervo] so original" (Opera Magazine, May 2017). Previous productions with Finnish National Opera include ParsifalCarmen, Sallinen's King Lear, and Wagner's Tristan und Isolde in spring 2016. Lintu has also worked with Tampere Opera and Estonian National Opera.

Hannu Lintu has made several recordings for Ondine, Naxos, Avie and Hyperion. His recording of selected works by Erkki-Sven Tüür (with Christoffer Sundqvist, Pekka Kuusisto and the FRSO) was released in February 2017; Prokofiev's Piano Concertos with Olli Mustonen, Mahler's Symphony No.1, and Messiaen's Turangalîla Symphony with Angela Hewitt and Valerie Hartmann-Claverie are among other recent releases. Lintu has received several accolades for his recordings, including a 2011 Grammy nomination for Best Opera CD, plus Gramophone Award nominations for his recordings of Enescu's Symphony No.2 with the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra and the Violin Concertos of Sibelius and Thomas Adès with Augustin Hadelich and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Hannu Lintu studied cello and piano at the Sibelius Academy, where he later studied conducting with Jorma Panula. He participated in masterclasses with Myung-Whun Chung at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena, Italy, and took first prize at the Nordic Conducting Competition in Bergen in 1994.

at Symphony Hall
301 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, United States

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All About Guitars – Strings, Shape And Sound

All About Guitars – Strings, Shape And Sound

`Still my guitar gently weeps` – if you have been as touched by this haunting Beatles number as countless others have been but are clueless about guitars per se; well, here is a quick run-through.

Guitars basically fall into two categories; acoustic and electrical. Acoustic guitars are the most traditional and the most commonly used guitars. Made of thin wood, these guitars are hollow and large and do not use any external amplification. Because these are hollow, when attached to any electronic devices, the acoustic signals in them get transferred to an amplifier. They are suitable for any type of music but suit the genre of country or folk music best. Acoustic guitars again come in different categories and each has its own characteristics. They are the classical, twelve-string, steel, bass and resonator guitars.

Classical guitars have strings made of nylon and they have wider necks in comparison to other guitars. These guitars are mostly used for classical music and ballads and the sounds emanating from them are warm and gentle. A classical guitar is excellent for playing the Flamenco as the full-bodied sounds emerging from the guitar complements that particular style of music very well. This guitar is also great for chord-plucking, running arpeggios and nail-strumming. Since these guitars have wide necks with short fingers, playing them can be quite challenging.

The twelve-string guitar is made up of twelve strings as opposed to the more common six strings which make up the majority of the guitars. The strings are so paired that each pair has the same note but with one of the string tuned at a higher octave. A semi-chorus type of effect is achieved with his arrangement of the strings.

The steel guitars are played in a horizontal manner by either keeping them on their stands or placing them across the knees of the player. The two main types of the steel guitars are the lap steel guitars and the pedal steel guitars.

Bass guitars may have strings ranging from four to six with the four string guitar being most commonly used. The strings of a bass guitar are long and thick and tuning the guitar can be quite a difficult job. This guitar brings out the bass of the rhythm and electric bass guitars are beginning to be more popular.

Resonator guitars were basically invented to increase the volume of the music of the traditional acoustic guitar. These guitars are made of metal, unlike the usual wood and are most popularly used in country music, bluegrass and the blues. They are also known as resophonic guitars.

Electric guitars are different from the acoustic ones in that require amplification for the music to be heard properly. Unlike the classical guitars, they have longer necks and solid or semi-hollow bodies. They have to be connected to amplifiers to increase the vibrations which are generated by playing upon these guitars. The strings of electric guitars are fine-tuned with the help of control knobs and these also produce a variety of tunes. Electric guitars are much easier to play as less force is required to press its strings and tuning is also comparatively simpler. These guitars are used to generate heart-thumping music and thus are ideally suited for rock, hip-hop, funk and rap music.

Archtop guitars are hollow or semi-solid and use thick steel strings and can be either electric or acoustic. Jazz music is prominently played on these guitars and they are characterized by their arch-like shape at the top.

So, all you wannabe Elvis Presleys or Beatles fans can now take their pick from these guitars and strum to their hearts` content!

`Still my guitar gently weeps` – if you have been as touched by this haunting Beatles number as countless others have been but are clueless about guitars per se; well, here is a quick run-through.

Guitars basically fall into two categories; acoustic and electrical. Acoustic guitars are the most traditional and the most commonly used guitars. Made of thin wood, these guitars are hollow and large and do not use any external amplification. Because these are hollow, when attached to any electronic devices, the acoustic signals in them get transferred to an amplifier. They are suitable for any type of music but suit the genre of country or folk music best. Acoustic guitars again come in different categories and each has its own characteristics. They are the classical, twelve-string, steel, bass and resonator guitars.

Classical guitars have strings made of nylon and they have wider necks in comparison to other guitars. These guitars are mostly used for classical music and ballads and the sounds emanating from them are warm and gentle. A classical guitar is excellent for playing the Flamenco as the full-bodied sounds emerging from the guitar complements that particular style of music very well. This guitar is also great for chord-plucking, running arpeggios and nail-strumming. Since these guitars have wide necks with short fingers, playing them can be quite challenging.

The twelve-string guitar is made up of twelve strings as opposed to the more common six strings which make up the majority of the guitars. The strings are so paired that each pair has the same note but with one of the string tuned at a higher octave. A semi-chorus type of effect is achieved with his arrangement of the strings.

The steel guitars are played in a horizontal manner by either keeping them on their stands or placing them across the knees of the player. The two main types of the steel guitars are the lap steel guitars and the pedal steel guitars.

Bass guitars may have strings ranging from four to six with the four string guitar being most commonly used. The strings of a bass guitar are long and thick and tuning the guitar can be quite a difficult job. This guitar brings out the bass of the rhythm and electric bass guitars are beginning to be more popular.

Resonator guitars were basically invented to increase the volume of the music of the traditional acoustic guitar. These guitars are made of metal, unlike the usual wood and are most popularly used in country music, bluegrass and the blues. They are also known as resophonic guitars.

Electric guitars are different from the acoustic ones in that require amplification for the music to be heard properly. Unlike the classical guitars, they have longer necks and solid or semi-hollow bodies. They have to be connected to amplifiers to increase the vibrations which are generated by playing upon these guitars. The strings of electric guitars are fine-tuned with the help of control knobs and these also produce a variety of tunes. Electric guitars are much easier to play as less force is required to press its strings and tuning is also comparatively simpler. These guitars are used to generate heart-thumping music and thus are ideally suited for rock, hip-hop, funk and rap music.

Archtop guitars are hollow or semi-solid and use thick steel strings and can be either electric or acoustic. Jazz music is prominently played on these guitars and they are characterized by their arch-like shape at the top.

So, all you wannabe Elvis Presleys or Beatles fans can now take their pick from these guitars and strum to their hearts` content!

You can have access to articles about guitars in portuguese language from page Guitar

Roberto Sedycias works as IT consultant for Polomercantil

Article from articlesbase.com

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Q&A: Can you restring a folk guitar with nylon strings?

Question by John C: Can you restring a folk guitar with nylon strings?
I’ve got a Yamaha FG 412 (which isn’t really a folk guitar but uses steel strings). I’ve got phosphor bronze strings on them now but lately they’ve been killing my fingers. Can you restring a guitar like this with nylon strings?

Best answer:

Answer by Briana N
ya i have a folk guitar to i did it with yellow neon strings they feel so much softer

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Rotosound FM66 Funk Master Bass Strings

Rotosound FM66 Funk Master Bass Strings

  • Because it’s got to be funky

Gauges: 30-50-70-90. Long scale. These light gauge sets became the funk and fusion choice of the ’80s, made popular by such notables as Stanley Clarke and Mark King. Rotosound makes the world’s most famous and highest-quality roundwound electric bass strings.

Rating: (out of 1 reviews)

List Price: $ 39.95

Price: $ 24.95

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Zing Went The Strings Of My Heart (Live) Reviews

Zing Went The Strings Of My Heart (Live)

Price: $ 0.99

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